Old’n’Tasty Records @ RockmusicRaider – Vol. II

RockmusicRaider - Old'n'Tasty RecordsYou need to give it to them old folks. The ’70’s and ’80s were very productive as far as music is concerned. Barely emerged from early-age rock’n’roll, blues and – not to forget – jazz, rock and later metal were on their quest to claim their place in the musical landscape. This was a time of experimentation, constructing tunes for the future. Not making music for the masses, through old designs like so much patchwork. Which is – come to think of it – what we see a lot of today.

Indeed, older records are – still today – all the rage with many a fan. And – surprisingly – with younger folks, too. I have seen university students debate UFO records for instance – Obsession to be precise – in forum threads.Got hooked? Raid this some more...

Rainbow – Down To Earth (1979) – Review

RockmusicRaider Review - Rainbow - Down To Earth - Album CoverBlasphemy, oh sweet blasphemy. After Rainbow‘s resounding successes Rising and Long Live Rock’n’Roll, the master decided to take a different route. Down to Earth took a much more commercial tack that sent the mainstream haters into flight mode. In other words, Dio defected and landed in the bosom of Black Sabbath as a first step. One huge ego thrust into another bunch of huge egos, wow. But – quite predictably –  not for long, ’cause he then got out of dodge relatively quickly to settle in his own gig. So, things were pretty simple back then. Right?

Well, not quite. The album should actually have a blood-red color, so sanguine were the ‘killings’ amongst the band. Ritchie Blackmore already got rid of Jimmy Bain (RiP) in 1977, kind of right after Rising finished touring.Got hooked? Raid this some more...

Rainbow – Rising (1976) – Review

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RockmusicRaider Review - Rainbow - Rising - Album CoverIt is funny how hindsight vision 20/20 is clear and precise. Back in time Rainbow and their second full length record Rising did – at first – not garner a lot of heightened attention. It really did not – apart from a tight circle of rock nerds perhaps. The sound was good, damn straight, but not stellar. ‘Yet Another Decent Hard Rock Record’ as we would say today.

It is also true that Rainbow was ever present and blasting out of a multitude of loudspeakers. But so was Status Quo and many others. Yet still, Rising kind of had the nerve to stick itself to your neurons. And somehow followed you around big time until you gave in and got a copy.Got hooked? Raid this some more...